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Affricative 

and Nasal 

Consonants

All material in this site from: 

Your Voice and Articulation by Ethel C. Glenn, Phillip J. Glenn, and Sandra Forman

4th edition, Allyn and Bacon, 1998

This page is dedicated to the production of the AFFRICATIVE AND NASAL sounds.

Click on symbols below to go to practice area.

is a voiceless, lingua-palatial-alveolar affricate
is a voiced, lingua-palatial-alveolar affricate
is a voiced, bilabial nasal  
is a voiced, lingua-alveolar nasal
is a voiced, lingua-velar nasal

Caution:  Nasals sounds are very similar.  Play close attention to the production of the sound.

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   is a voiceless, lingua-palatial-alveolar affricate
The tip and blade of the tongue are in broad, firm contact with the gum ridge.  When air pressure is built up, the tongue is lowered, releasing the air in such a way as to create a fricative-like sound.    is voiceless.
click for sound

Positions:

Frontal

Medial Final

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is a voiced, lingua-palatial-alveolar affricate
The tip and blade of the tongue are in broad, firm contact with the gum ridge.  When air pressure is built up, the tongue is lowered, releasing the air in such a way as to create a fricative-like sound.   is voiced
   click for   sound

Positions:

Frontal

Medial Final

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is a voiced, bilabial nasal
 To form the consonant , lower the soft palate so that air can move freely through the nasal passage.  Bring the lips firmly together as for the stops and , and expel air through the nose.  is voiced.
   click for sound

Positions:

Frontal

Medial Final Final, followed by p Final, followed by s (z)

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is a voiced, lingua-alveolar nasal
To form , lower the soft palate so that air can move freely through the nasal passages.  Press the tip of the tongue against the gum ridge as in the formation of and , and expel the air through the nose.  The sound is voiced.  
   click for sound

Positions:

Frontal

Medial Final

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is a voiced, lingua-velar nasal
To form , lower the soft palate so that air can move freely through the nasal passages.  While the air is passing through the nose, the back of the tongue and the lowered soft palate meet to articulate the sound within the mouth.  The sound is voiced.
   click for sound

Positions:

Frontal

Medial Final

does not appear in the frontal position

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